Friday, July 4, 2014

(Source: the-big-i-am)

Tuesday, May 27, 2014
humansofnewyork:

I saw a drummer in Central Park give his sticks to a little kid, so that he could have a try. Ten minutes later, this was happening…

humansofnewyork:

I saw a drummer in Central Park give his sticks to a little kid, so that he could have a try. Ten minutes later, this was happening…

carsontheroad:

Chevrolet Bel Air 1956selected by CarsOnTheRoad

carsontheroad:

Chevrolet Bel Air 1956
selected by CarsOnTheRoad

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Tuesday, May 6, 2014
nprcodeswitch:

Can student journalists ban “Redskins” from their school paper?
"Redskins."
That word sits at the center of a controversy in suburban Philadelphia. It’s pitted student journalists against school board members, but has left the school community largely shrugging its shoulders.
Student editors at Neshaminy High School in Bucks County have vowed not to print the word, which is the school’s Native American mascot.
The Neshaminy School Board, however, is expected to vote later this month on a policy that would reverse the ban.
Read the entire story on Code Switch.
Photo credit: Courtesy of Neshaminy Football.

nprcodeswitch:

Can student journalists ban “Redskins” from their school paper?

"Redskins."

That word sits at the center of a controversy in suburban Philadelphia. It’s pitted student journalists against school board members, but has left the school community largely shrugging its shoulders.

Student editors at Neshaminy High School in Bucks County have vowed not to print the word, which is the school’s Native American mascot.

The Neshaminy School Board, however, is expected to vote later this month on a policy that would reverse the ban.

Read the entire story on Code Switch.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Neshaminy Football.

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

mypubliclands:

Happy Teacher Appreciation Day!

Thank you for influencing the next generation of conservation leaders! 

-From all of us at the Bureau of Land Management

nprbooks:

In 1887, American journalist Nellie Bly had herself committed to New York’s notorious Blackwell’s Island insane asylum — on purpose, as part of an assignment from the New York World newspaper. When she was released 10 days later, she had seen cruelty that made her shudder. In her account for the World, she wrote:

"I left the insane ward with pleasure and regret. Pleasure that I was once more able to enjoy the free breath of heaven; regret that I could not have brought with me some of the unfortunate women who lived and suffered with me, and who I am convinced are just as sane as I was and am now myself.”

The story that resulted is called “Ten Days in a Mad-House,” and it’s one of many pieces collected in a new volume, Nellie Bly: Around the World in Seventy-Two Days and Other Writings — released this year in honor of Bly’s 150th birthday. The book’s editor, Jean Lutes, talked about Bly’s legacy on Morning Edition yesterday.
Image via Library of Congress

nprbooks:

In 1887, American journalist Nellie Bly had herself committed to New York’s notorious Blackwell’s Island insane asylum — on purpose, as part of an assignment from the New York World newspaper. When she was released 10 days later, she had seen cruelty that made her shudder. In her account for the World, she wrote:

"I left the insane ward with pleasure and regret. Pleasure that I was once more able to enjoy the free breath of heaven; regret that I could not have brought with me some of the unfortunate women who lived and suffered with me, and who I am convinced are just as sane as I was and am now myself.”

The story that resulted is called Ten Days in a Mad-House,” and it’s one of many pieces collected in a new volume, Nellie Bly: Around the World in Seventy-Two Days and Other Writings — released this year in honor of Bly’s 150th birthday. The book’s editor, Jean Lutes, talked about Bly’s legacy on Morning Edition yesterday.

Image via Library of Congress

Monday, April 21, 2014