Monday, April 21, 2014
Saturday, April 19, 2014 Friday, April 18, 2014
oldnewyork:

Growing up in the Lower East Side in the 1950s

"Walking to school each day, I passed the Italian butcher shop, carcasses hanging in the window, and the fish monger, the dead bodies of fish, heads and tails intact staring up at me from their bed of ice … The Italian grocer on the corner, narrow and dark, redolent of those smells only an Italian grocery has: Parmesan cheese, olives, prosciutto and more …"

" … the bodega where the Puerto Rican owner spoke no English and I stood with a nickel or dime in my grimy hand working hard to choose penny-candy from the glass case … Dots (those pastel half-circles of sugar pasted on a long strip of white paper), Smarties, miniature wax Coke bottles filled with dark syrup, red wax lips, candy cigarettes, Necco Wafers …"

"The Italian ice place next-door [sold] lemon ices, smooth and tart, … served in a pleated paper cup. You’d squish it to get the ices to come up where they could be licked…"

Dammit, Billie Frank, you have my childhood and I want it back.

oldnewyork:

Growing up in the Lower East Side in the 1950s

"Walking to school each day, I passed the Italian butcher shop, carcasses hanging in the window, and the fish monger, the dead bodies of fish, heads and tails intact staring up at me from their bed of ice … The Italian grocer on the corner, narrow and dark, redolent of those smells only an Italian grocery has: Parmesan cheese, olives, prosciutto and more …"

" … the bodega where the Puerto Rican owner spoke no English and I stood with a nickel or dime in my grimy hand working hard to choose penny-candy from the glass case … Dots (those pastel half-circles of sugar pasted on a long strip of white paper), Smarties, miniature wax Coke bottles filled with dark syrup, red wax lips, candy cigarettes, Necco Wafers …"

"The Italian ice place next-door [sold] lemon ices, smooth and tart, … served in a pleated paper cup. You’d squish it to get the ices to come up where they could be licked…"

Dammit, Billie Frank, you have my childhood and I want it back.

helloyoucreatives:

Flipped album covers. 

karenhurley:

In light of the conflict between Ukraine and Russia, Ogilvy & Mather Japan has come up with a series of ads for the non-profit organization ADOT.COM

Ahhhh…. “trAction Park” at its finest…   

Rare footage has New Jersey residents recollecting memories from a time when summer debauchery was far from limited to just the Jersey Shore.The Cannonball Loop was as talked about by New Jersey residents as the theme park it could be found in. Now, rare footage of the slide has park-goers recollecting memories of past visits. Visitors to the theme park referred to the place by a litany of nicknames: Friction Park, Class Action Park, and Accident Park to name a few. Chances are if you grew up in northern New Jersey, you have heard of or paid a visit to Action Park. The Vernon, N.J., attraction was one of America’s first water parks. Welcoming patrons from Memorial Day to Labor Day, it opened its doors in 1978 and first closed in 1996.

Ahhhh…. “trAction Park” at its finest…

Rare footage has New Jersey residents recollecting memories from a time when summer debauchery was far from limited to just the Jersey Shore.The Cannonball Loop was as talked about by New Jersey residents as the theme park it could be found in. Now, rare footage of the slide has park-goers recollecting memories of past visits. Visitors to the theme park referred to the place by a litany of nicknames: Friction Park, Class Action Park, and Accident Park to name a few. Chances are if you grew up in northern New Jersey, you have heard of or paid a visit to Action Park. The Vernon, N.J., attraction was one of America’s first water parks. Welcoming patrons from Memorial Day to Labor Day, it opened its doors in 1978 and first closed in 1996.

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

Thursday, April 17, 2014
Toyota brand increases San Francisco car sales 17 percent with geo-targeted search engine marketing

Andy Barton, Scion digital and interactive marketing manager, agrees the Torrance, Calif.-based Toyota brand had astronomical search engine marketing issues back in June 2012. That’s when Scion leaders, national and regional, met to figure out how to drive increased traffic and leads to dealers and found “key gaps” in the brand’s search results—specifically for local terms.
Scions of Local Search
Friday, March 28, 2014

colchrishadfield:

Ever tried a Guinness? While in Dublin’s fair city I went to their lab & saw the detail of how it’s made - & tasted!